Silent Air Compressors: As if the dentist’s drill wasn’t noisy enough…

You might not see it, but there’s an air compressor lurking somewhere in your dentist’s surgery. How else do you think he does that annoying thing where he sticks a tube into your mouth and you hear a hiss and feel a sudden blast of cold air on your teeth? Hang on a minute though, air compressors are big and powerful and…noisy, aren’t they? The answer is: not always.

Dental and medical surgeries, hospitals and other workplaces that need a supply of low-pressure compressed air but don’t need additional noise pollution rely upon silent air compressors. Specialist air compressor manufactures such as Bambi produce silent air compressors to very high specifications that are suited to use in medical environments. Bambi silent air compressors typically have a noise output below 40 decibels; a typical conversation between two people is around 60 decibels. Which means that if your dentist’s silent air compressor is tucked away in a cupboard you won’t even know it’s there, leaving you free to enjoy the whine of the dentist’s drill and the sound of his scream when you bite his finger…

Vertical compressor: stands the test.

A vertical compressor is always there: maybe in the corner, maybe in the middle of the floor, maybe backed to the wall or maybe to the side of another piece of equipment, but usually standing still and tall and, crucially, stationary.

Where you have an ongoing need for a power supply to operate something such as a huge production line, or a consistent feat of engineering, then the vertical compressor is the answer. Not suitable for outdoor use nor suitable where portable supplies are necessary, this compressor is a model for indoors and for supplying compressed air on a daily basis for repetitive work over a long period of time.  Given that it stands taller than it is wide then it also saves on space. Typically, a vertical compressor will give you long service and will easily yield a strong and reliable performance – even for very heavy duty work-load requirements, and is usually available with anti-vibration mounts.

For all those needing strength and reliability in a high production environment, and equally not wanting to use equipment that takes up too much room, consider a slim-fit straight up and down cylindrical vertical compressor to take the weight of your work load. It makes sense.

Air compressor supplier Nottingham: a light in the dark

Like the beam of light from a lighthouse guiding ships to safety, an air compressor supplier in Nottingham provides a service to workplaces which is at the very least useful and at the most a life-saving act.

For body repair shops when the air tools necessary to weld, hammer, ratchet, spray paint, and inflate need a good air compressor then clearly an air compressor supplier in Nottingham is just what you need. Go and consult over whether you want a compressor that can be moved around the workshop floor, or maybe moved from floor to floor.  Have a talk about something that will go outside to different places or about something installed in one place where lengths of hose can reach the point of work. A good air compressor supplier in Nottingham will give sound advice and probably be able to show you a selection of the compressors you might be looking for.

For more specific requirements such as a vibration free, silent compressor that can adjust speed, or for a compressor that is appropriate to clinical environments such as a dental practice, a research laboratory or a hospital then an air compressor supplier will guide you to the right compressor equipment.   The role of the air compressor supplier is that of a specialist in a specialist field or as we like to say, a life saver who offers a lifeline to all those in need.

Entire Cities Could Run on Compressed Air

Not only can compressed air power compressed air tools. The company LightSail Energy started out a few years ago with a student’s modest idea for a compressed air scooter, and now it has just raised $37.3 million in private funding to bring utility scale, compressed air energy storage to the market. That’s a big leap not only for the company but for compressed air technology itself, which has long been eyed for its clean energy potential. The problem has been to make the process efficient enough to deliver power at a commercial scale, so let’s take a look and see how LightSail solved the problem.

The Compressed Air Conundrum
As aptly described by writer Rachel Metz over at the MIT Technology Review, half of the compressed-air equation is simple enough from a clean energy perspective. You can use any form of alternative energy such as solar or wind to generate electricity, which in turn powers a motor that compresses air in a tank.
The  hard part kicks in when you try to store large quantities of compressed air. Compression adds energy in the form of heat (almost 1,000 degrees centigrade, according to Metz) and that leads to enormous complications.
The Indian car manufacturer Tata Motors has apparently found at least a partial solution for small scale compressed air, but LightSail is going down an entirely different road.
LightSail’s Compressed Air Solution
Danielle Fong, Chief Scientist and co-founder of LightSail, is the former student who dreamed of a compressed-air scooter. She solved part of the problem by designing two related features into the system. One involves using mist to cool the air, and the other involves recapturing energy from the spent mist, in the form of heat.
According to Metz, Fong and her partners also identified a compound that could be used to manufacture tanks strong enough to store bulk quantities of compressed air above ground, in relatively inexpensive facilities, leading to the conclusion that “there are no technical barriers to building units large enough to power entire cities.”
As for whether it works or not, the new round of funding indicates a pretty high degree of confidence. It was spearheaded by legendary investor Peter Thiel of PayPal fame, and it included early investor Khosla Ventures as well as Bill Gates and Innovacorp among others.
Compressed Air Meets Wind Power
As a side note, compressed air technology is also expanding its role in the alternative energy field through the avenue of wind power.
One example is a compressed-air wind turbine that is designed like a funnel, with no exposed blades, in order to cut down risks for birds.
Along similar lines, an Air Force veteran has come up with a low cost wind turbine  that uses a steady stream of compressed air from silos. The design is aimed at enabling small farmers on a budget to leverage their existing infrastructure, including silos and grid connections.
Alternative Energy and Democracy
Environmental and financial issues usually dominate the conversation about clean energy, but in announcing the new round of funding, LightSail CEO and co-founder Steve Crane teased out the truly transformative potential of alternative energy from a social and political perspective:
“We want to democratize energy – to enable renewable sources to supply energy on demand locally and at a lower cost than centralized fossil-fuel based generation.”
That’s the piece missing from the fossil fuel puzzle, the ability of a democratically organized community to make decisions about its primary sources of energy, just as it makes decisions about roads, zoning, schools, public safety and a host of other issues that are fundamental to the quality of life.
Clean Technica (http://s.tt/1sSPx)
Read more at http://cleantechnica.com/2012/11/10/entire-cities-could-run-on-compressed-air-from-lightsail/#o2mx4hUYvgy9CLmu.99

The company LightSail Energy started out a few years ago with a student’s modest idea for a compressed air scooter, and now it has just raised $37.3 million in private funding to bring utility scale, compressed air energy storage to the market. That’s a big leap not only for the company but for compressed air technology itself, which has long been eyed for its clean energy potential. The problem has been to make the process efficient enough to deliver power at a commercial scale, so let’s take a look and see how LightSail solved the problem.The Compressed Air ConundrumAs aptly described by writer Rachel Metz over at the MIT Technology Review, half of the compressed-air equation is simple enough from a clean energy perspective. You can use any form of alternative energy such as solar or wind to generate electricity, which in turn powers a motor that compresses air in a tank.The  hard part kicks in when you try to store large quantities of compressed air. Compression adds energy in the form of heat (almost 1,000 degrees centigrade, according to Metz) and that leads to enormous complications.The Indian car manufacturer Tata Motors has apparently found at least a partial solution for small scale compressed air, but LightSail is going down an entirely different road.LightSail’s Compressed Air SolutionDanielle Fong, Chief Scientist and co-founder of LightSail, is the former student who dreamed of a compressed-air scooter. She solved part of the problem by designing two related features into the system. One involves using mist to cool the air, and the other involves recapturing energy from the spent mist, in the form of heat.According to Metz, Fong and her partners also identified a compound that could be used to manufacture tanks strong enough to store bulk quantities of compressed air above ground, in relatively inexpensive facilities, leading to the conclusion that “there are no technical barriers to building units large enough to power entire cities.”As for whether it works or not, the new round of funding indicates a pretty high degree of confidence. It was spearheaded by legendary investor Peter Thiel of PayPal fame, and it included early investor Khosla Ventures as well as Bill Gates and Innovacorp among others.Compressed Air Meets Wind PowerAs a side note, compressed air technology is also expanding its role in the alternative energy field through the avenue of wind power.One example is a compressed-air wind turbine that is designed like a funnel, with no exposed blades, in order to cut down risks for birds.Along similar lines, an Air Force veteran has come up with a low cost wind turbine  that uses a steady stream of compressed air from silos. The design is aimed at enabling small farmers on a budget to leverage their existing infrastructure, including silos and grid connections.Alternative Energy and

DemocracyEnvironmental and financial issues usually dominate the conversation about clean energy, but in announcing the new round of funding, LightSail CEO and co-founder Steve Crane teased out the truly transformative potential of alternative energy from a social and political perspective:“We want to democratize energy – to enable renewable sources to supply energy on demand locally and at a lower cost than centralized fossil-fuel based generation.”That’s the piece missing from the fossil fuel puzzle, the ability of a democratically organized community to make decisions about its primary sources of energy, just as it makes decisions about roads, zoning, schools, public safety and a host of other issues that are fundamental to the quality of life.

Compressor servicing : a bank account

If our banks carried out servicing of our household accounts as thoroughly as we undertake compressor servicing, then we would be happy people.  A good overhaul of all our debits and a review of loans and credits, a few tweaks here and there, in our favour of course, and a recalculation of the balance – also in our favour, and we would be absolutely delighted.  This is the stuff of dreams, and wild dreams at that. Usually we simply get a letter describing a whole new set of charges for any type of accounts administration.

Compressor servicing is a much more down to earth type of overhaul – and as we will review, clean and adjust your equipment, and even suggest replacement parts where necessary, we are definitely in the land of those who are conscious.  Compressor servicing with Air Supplies is, without a shadow of a doubt, a job that does actually exist in our world.  We carefully examine the under and over spends of each and every air compressor and examine the reasons for the occasional overdraft, and then we simply apply our maintenance services. Hey presto, a working and usable compressor with plenty of mileage, until its next compressor service, and we quite categorically do not apply any hidden or over charges.

Vertical compressor: treasured like all the Vs

A vertical compressor stands tall, just as you would want it to.  Filling the air rather than the ground, it is a beauty for saving on floor space if you are short of it. Small workshops will find that a vertical compressor will not hinder the flow of traffic by much at all, which is not the only advantage of this useful piece of compressor equipment. It is easy to install, will not move around and has a reputation for reliability and for years of faithful service – just like a pet Labrador, except of course it is taller and does not bounce.

The vertical compressor shares its leading initial with many illustrious others: a vampire – notorious for tall and elegant, if dangerous and disturbing, presence, a vaulting pole jumper – famous for leaping on the end of a huge willow stick during Olympic games, a violin – known for heartrending soulful strings that make beautiful music, a vaudeville act – enjoyed by so many in the heyday of musicals, a vanquished love – a requisite in most Hollywood movies and a velveteen rabbit – loved by so many children. There are so many Vs we can’t list them all.

Our vertical compressor equipment offers the same high quality that all the Vs do. Go further into this website and you will find a range of very good, very sturdy and very respectable vertical compressors amongst which you will almost certainly find what you are looking for.

Forget electric cars, this one runs on compressed air

India’s Tata Motors is pushing technology for compressed air to power cars forward with its project to build “Airpods”  zero-pollution, cute-as-a-bug smartcars that zip along at 40 m.p.h. via the magic of squeezed air, The Atlantic Cities reports.

They are built with pneumatic motors that use pressurized air to drive pistons.

The mid-sized model fits three passengers, although one must face backward. Its tank can hold 175 liters of air, which a driver gets either at a specialized fueling station or by activating an onboard electric motor to suck it in. Its makers say that filling er’ up will cost a paltry €1, and that a full tank of air can last for roughly 125 miles.

tata airpod car 2

$10,000 Car – AirPod – That Runs On Air

Upgrade Your Garage Air Compressor With Compressed Air Tools

When you get serious about auto repair, it’s time to stock your garage with a good air compressor and air tools. These are the ones in our garage.

You can tell by the extent of a car guy’s air system when he’s gone from hobbyist to automotive mental patient. For grease monkeys the world over, air tools elicit envy—and for good reason. Their speed and power make car work dramatically easier and put more projects within reach. With a properly sized shop air system, cutting, grinding, polishing, painting, sanding, inflating, and even cleaning up take less time and sweat. Assembling a system for yourself can be a little daunting because there’s no shortage of lingo and fiddly components. We’ve put together a guide to the basics, along with a roundup of the tools we have in our own garage. Be warned, air tools can spoil you.

Air Compressor

Compressors are sized by SCFM—standard cubic feet per minute—the measure of how much air the machine can deliver when running constantly. An air compressor’s SCFM sets the minimum performance of the system hooked up to it, so look to the consumption rate of the tools you use to decide how to size the compressor. There are two types: Single-stage units are smaller and louder, cycle more often, and are less expensive. Two-stage compressors are quieter, cycle less frequently, and deliver lots of continuous pressure. Pressure tank size is another variable. Bigger tanks hold more air, so the compressor won’t kick on as often, but small tanks are portable. For more capacity, connect additional tanks by plugging into a quick-disconnect coupling with a rubber hose.

Pipes, Hoses, and Fittings

Design your system of air lines based on budget, garage size, and how often you use your tools. Flexible 3/8-inch rubber air hose is inexpensive and easy to store for the small shop and occasional use. With a bigger garage, consider permanently installed rigid air lines. Options range from simple iron pipe threaded together and sealed, to a slick system from Rapid-Air. The company’s modular wall-mounted high-volume hard-pipe or semirigid in-wall kits are assembled by using just a pipe cutter and reamer; if you want, the two systems can be used together.

With all setups, hoses and tools connect via a quick-disconnect coupling. This standardized fitting is threaded onto a hose or pipe end and positively connects the female end on the tool to the male end on the supply side. Be sure to use thread seal tape or plumber’s dope for airtight joints.

The End of the Line

The price of air tools varies wildly. Spend more on the tools you use the most, but feel free to shop for discounts on everything else.

[1] INFLATOR AND AIR GAUGE

Price range: $10 to $40

· Fill flat tires and never lose the pressure gauge; these flexible fillers make inflation a snap.

[2] DRILL

Price range: $40 to $200

· Air drills have the grunt to bore big holes in metal and never overheat or run out of power.

[3] ORBITAL SANDER

Price range: $30 to $120

· Air sanders offer more power than electric, a smoother action, and don’t fatigue your hands as quickly.

[4] RATCHET

Price range: $30 to $150

· Manual ratchets do the job, but these are faster and save time on big projects.

[5] CUTOFF WHEEL

Price range: $20 to $80

· It is the must-have tool for fast and dirty metal cutting.

[6] PAINT SPRAYER

Price range: $60 to $450

· High-volume, low-pressure paint sprayers deliver great results.

[7] DIE GRINDER

Price range: $20 to $120

· These are excellent for cleaning off paint, smoothing pitted rusty areas, and grinding down any metal that’s asking for it.

[8] HAMMER/CHISEL

Price range: $60 to $450

· Separate stubborn parts with an air hammer—good ones come with many useful ends.

[9] BLOW OFF

Price range: $2 to $10

· A valve and nozzle, this tool makes cleaning debris out of hard to reach places a snap; it also makes sweeping a thing of the past.

[10] IMPACT WRENCH

Price range: $60 to $450

· The iconic air tool, it develops up to 700 lb-ft of torque, so use it wisely and with a set of high-strength impact sockets.

[11] RECIPROCATING SAW

Price range: $40 to $130

· Great for clean cuts in metal, plastic, or wood.

App for compressed air measurement

Boge has launched an iPhone app which provides compressed air users with a remote monitoring solution.

The app enables remote viewing of information such as temperature, pressure, operating and idling times. It also notifies the user of fault messages or warnings.

The app receives data from the Boge airstatus remote auditing system which is installed inside the compressor. This machine data retrieval tool ensures that even the most remote or difficult to reach compressors can be monitored easily, enhancing production reliability.

The Boge app is available for download from the Apple Store.

Pursuit Motorcycle Runs on Compressed Air

Environmentally friendly people look out for this new innovative vehicle which runs completely on air! Ok, so it still requires energy to power the air compression compressor system but it is the first step towards an environmentally friendly future on the road. The Industrial Student Dean Benstead designed the bike looking to this future.

The design of the motorcycle was the focus of this project therefore its speed is not as fast as it could be. It still hits an excess of 62 mph however, which is the equivalent of 100 km/h. Its design is based on a current-spec 250cc motorcross bike and an Engineair’s DiPietro air engine is the bike’s power source. The rest of its design is taken from a WR250F motorcycle.

There are plans to make the vehicle more efficient and faster in the future as this is a prototype. The manufacturing process involved extensive research and the development of computer generated concepts before building began. Rinlatech Engineering was the company behind the final model.

There are plans to redesign the bike to make it more accessible. Benstead states that trying different metals such as titanium or aluminium, as opposed to the current steel model, may reduce the weight considerably, making it a faster bike and with a weight near to that of a standard cycle bike.

He plans to make the bike marketable to the public in the future which may see the beginnings of a new breed of environmentally friendly transport. See the O2 Pursuit on Friday 25th November at the Sydney Motorcycle and Scooter Show, Australia.